Module 1: Integer Exponents and Scientific Notation

In Grade 8 Module 1, students expand their basic knowledge of positive integer exponents and prove the Laws of Exponents for any integer exponent.  Next, students work with numbers in the form of an integer multiplied by a power of 10 to express how many times as much one is than the other.  This leads into an explanation of scientific notation and continued work performing operations on numbers written in this form. '

Topic A

Topic B

Module 2: The Concept of Congruence

In this module, students learn about translations, reflections, and rotations in the plane and, more importantly, how to use them to precisely define the concept of congruence. Throughout Topic A, on the definitions and properties of the basic rigid motions, students verify experimentally their basic properties and, when feasible, deepen their understanding of these properties using reasoning. All the lessons of Topic B demonstrate to students the ability to sequence various combinations of rigid motions while maintaining the basic properties of individual rigid motions. Students learn that congruence is just a sequence of basic rigid motions in Topic C, and Topic D begins the learning of Pythagorean Theorem.


Topic B

Topic C



Module 3: Similarity

In Module 3, students learn about dilation and similarity and apply that knowledge to a proof of the Pythagorean Theorem based on the Angle-Angle criterion for similar triangles.  The module begins with the definition of dilation, properties of dilations, and compositions of dilations.  One overarching goal of this module is to replace the common idea of “same shape, different sizes” with a definition of similarity that can be applied to geometric shapes that are not polygons, such as ellipses and circles. 

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Topic B

Topic C

Module 4: Linear Equations

In Module 4, students extend what they already know about unit rates and proportional relationships to linear equations and their graphs.  Students understand the connections between proportional relationships, lines, and linear equations in this module.  Students learn to apply the skills they acquired in Grades 6 and 7, with respect to symbolic notation and properties of equality to transcribe and solve equations in one variable and then in two variables. 

Topic A

Topic B

Topic C

Topic D&E

Module 5: Examples of Functions from Geometry

In the first topic of this 15 day module, students learn the concept of a function and why functions are necessary for describing geometric concepts and occurrences in everyday life.  Once a formal definition of a function is provided, students then consider functions of discrete and continuous rates and understand the difference between the two.  Students apply their knowledge of linear equations and their graphs from Module 4 to graphs of linear functions.  Students inspect the rate of change of linear functions and conclude that the rate of change is the slope of the graph of a line.  They learn to interpret the equation y=mx+b as defining a linear function whose graph is a line.  Students compare linear functions and their graphs and gain experience with non-linear functions as well.  In the second and final topic of this module, students extend what they learned in Grade 7 about how to solve real-world and mathematical problems related to volume from simple solids to include problems that require the formulas for cones, cylinders, and spheres. 

Module 6: Linear Functions

In Grades 6 and 7, students worked with data involving a single variable.  Module 6 introduces students to bivariate data.  Students are introduced to a function as a rule that assigns exactly one value to each input.  In this module, students use their understanding of functions to model the possible relationships of bivariate data.  This module is important in setting a foundation for students’ work in algebra in Grade 9.

Module 7: Introduction to Irrational Numbers Using Geometry

Module 7 begins with work related to the Pythagorean Theorem and right triangles.  Before the lessons of this module are presented to students, it is important that the lessons in Modules 2 and 3 related to the Pythagorean Theorem are taught (M2:  Lessons 15 and 16, M3:  Lessons 13 and 14).  In Modules 2 and 3, students used the Pythagorean Theorem to determine the unknown length of a right triangle.  In cases where the side length was an integer, students computed the length.  When the side length was not an integer, students left the answer in the form of x2=c, where c was not a perfect square number. Those solutions are revisited and are the motivation for learning about square roots and irrational numbers in general.